Gravity

If you jump out of an airplane, how fast would you fall? What’s the greatest speed you would reach? Let’s practice figuring it out without jumping out of a plane.


This experiment will help you get the concept of velocity by allowing you to measure the rate of fall of several objects. It’s also a great experiment to record in your science journal.


First, you’ll need to find your materials:


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You have just taken in a nice bunch of information about the wild world of gravity. This next section is for advanced students, who want to go even deeper. There’s a lot of great stuff here but there’s a lot of math as well. If you’re not a math person, feel free to pass this up. You’ll still have a nice understanding of the concept. However, I’d recommend giving it a try. There are some fun things to do and if you’re not careful, you might just end up enjoying it!


Here’s what you need:


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If I toss a ball horizontally at the exact same instant that I drop another one from my other hand, which one reaches the ground first? For this experiment, you need: Please login or register to read the rest of this content.


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Click here to go to next lesson on Force and Mass.


Comments

One Response to “Gravity”
  1. mad_tea_party says:

    Hi!
    A couple questions: For practice problem 7 on 1-D Kinematics Student worksheet, is the unit conversion from hours to seconds correct? I get 5 seconds equals 0.0014 hours, but the solution shows 0.002 hours.

    For problem 8 on 1-D Kinematics Student worksheet, you define the max acceleration but not the max deceleration. My Dad said to assume they are the same. Is that right? He said that looking at your solution, it appears that you are assuming the train is already at Vi 1.6 km out. He thinks that if acceleration and deceleration are the same rate, I should divide the distance in half to solve for Vmax and then double that time for the overall elapsed time? Is he correct?

    Thanks! And also thanks for making physics fun and understandable 🙂
    Bri

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