How to Add and Multiply Quickly in your Head

Want a peek under the ‘hood’ of my brain when I do a mental math calculation? This video is a slow-motion, step-by-step snapshot of what goes on when I add numbers in my head. The first thing you need to learn is how to add from LEFT to RIGHT, which is opposite from most math classes out there. I’ll show you how to do this – it’s easy, and essential to working bigger numbers in your head.


Here’s what you do:
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Comments

7 Responses to “How to Add and Multiply Quickly in your Head”
  1. Aurora says:

    I’ll have my team contact you right away to make sure your account is set up correctly!

  2. lemmonlear says:

    I am trying to view the video to this lesson but it says I do not have access. I have the 9th-12th grade subscription though. Am I doing something wrong? There are quite a few videos that I am having this issue with. Thanks for your help!

  3. Deanna Wilds says:

    Thank you for introducing a more efficient way to work with numbers. My son has been using these methods for mental multiplication and addition since he started doing math, whereas I, as his bumbling homeschool mother, have been trying to insist on the more traditional methods, for fear that he must be doing things wrong. Thank you for opening my eyes–although once my son sees this, he is going to say, “I told you so, Mom!”

  4. Laura Amon says:

    Thanks, Aurora.

    We figured out that I needed to use a different browser. Now I can access all of the videos referred to in the text.

    Thanks,
    Laura Amon

  5. Aurora says:

    Make sure you are logged in – it’s right under the words “I’ll show you how to do this – it’s easy, and essential to working bigger numbers in your head. Here’s what you do: “

  6. Laura Amon says:

    Hi Aurora,

    There was no video attached to “How to Add and Multiply Quickly in your Head.” Was the link deleted?

  7. Cortland Hill says:

    I think the 300X126 example for L to R multiplication is misleading and confusing – since it’s really 3X126, you should say this, simplify the problem and add the zeros at the end. Scientific notation would work better here.

    As worked: the 60 should be placed in the proper location under 300 – you write it as if if represents 600 not 60.

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